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Those relationships often become quite intimate, even when they aren't romantic in nature.That in itself can be problematic but when those friendships grow into romances, watch out!Title I of the ADA protects individuals from employment discrimination on the basis of disability, limits when and how an employer may make medical inquiries or require medical examinations of employees and applicants for employment, and requires that an employer provide reasonable accommodation for an employee or applicant with a disability.

Because of the amount of time we spend at work, side by side with our coworkers, our social lives and professional lives often become entwined.Part II addresses the impact of the ADA's expanded definition of "disability" on employees with pregnancy-related impairments, particularly when employees with pregnancy-related impairments would be entitled to reasonable accommodation, and describes some specific accommodations that may help pregnant workers.Part III briefly describes other requirements unrelated to the PDA and the ADA that affect pregnant workers. In passing the PDA, Congress intended to prohibit discrimination based on "the whole range of matters concerning the childbearing process," Thus, the PDA covers all aspects of pregnancy and all aspects of employment, including hiring, firing, promotion, health insurance benefits, and treatment in comparison with non-pregnant persons similar in their ability or inability to work.OBSOLETE DATA: This Enforcement Guidance supersedes the Enforcement Guidance on Pregnancy Discrimination and Related Issues dated July 14, 2014.Most of this revised guidance remains the same as the prior version, but changes have been made to Sections I. C.1 (Light Duty) in response to the Supreme Court's decision in Congress enacted the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) in 1978 to make clear that discrimination based on pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions is a form of sex discrimination prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII). employees over other employees.'" By enacting the PDA, Congress sought to make clear that "[p]regnant women who are able to work must be permitted to work on the same conditions as other employees; and when they are not able to work for medical reasons, they must be accorded the same rights, leave privileges and other benefits, as other workers who are disabled from working." on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions; and 2) Women affected by pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions must be treated the same as other persons not so affected but similar in their ability or inability to work.

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